How to Protect Your Golden Retriever From Ticks

Due to factors like milder winters, an increase in white tailed deer, and fewer insecticides being used, 2013 was predicted as a record year for ticks.  Ticks are a problem for animals and humans alike.  Tick species vary by location, and different species carry different diseases like Lyme Disease,  Ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Are ticks a problem in your area?  Do you have any ideas or suggestions to keep them away?  I have compiled a list of some of the things you can do to help avoid this very common problem.

 

  • Keep your lawn cut short.  Ticks and other critters love to lurk in long grass
  • Try to avoid long grass and wooded areas
  • Check your dog for ticks every time you bring him/her indoors.
  • Visit your veterinarian every spring to discuss flea/tick and heart worm prevention medications.
  • There are shampoos and collars on the market that deter fleas and ticks.
  • Try a holistic approach such as this homeade recipe from an article in Forbes  It’s Peak Tick Season: 7 Ways to avoid Tick-Borne Disease by Melanie Haiken.

“In a spray bottle, mix 1 cup water and 2 cups distilled white vinegar. (Ticks loathe the smell and taste of vinegar, supposedly.) Add 2 teaspoons vegetable or almond oil, both of which contain sulfur, which ticks also dislike.”

 

 

Tick Population to Explode in 2013 – Veterinary Practice News

Adult deer tick, Ixodes scapularis.

Adult deer tick, Ixodes scapularis. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

Now that we know this, lets talk prevention.  Here are some things you can do to help protect your golden from these pests:

 

So you have found a tick on your dog.  First, you must remove it with tweezers or a Tick Twister.  It is not recommended that you burn it or suffocate it off with any type of substance, as this can cause the tick to inject more saliva into you or your pet.  Then clean the area with an antiseptic and put some antibiotic ointment on the site.

Here is a great video from Doctors Foster & Smith on removing a tick from your dog:

If your dog has been bitten by a tick, watch for signs of illness including stiffness, loss of appetite and lethargy.  Contact your veterinarian right away if you suspect your dog has a tick borne illness. Keep in mind these illnesses can lay dormant for several months before showing signs.