Does Your Golden Retriever Drool?

Generally speaking, golden retrievers are very food motivated dogs, and as a result, sometimes are overweight.  They eat ravenously and have a bottomless pit for a stomach.

Tucker likes to watch us eat, but when we eat certain foods, (usually bacon or pizza) he will often drool.  Lots.

Drooling while humans eat is one thing, but keep in mind that excessive drooling can be caused by a number of other reasons.  For example, drooling in the car is usually a sign of nervousness.

Sudden, unexplained drooling could mean an injury to the mouth or irritation of the gums or even a symptom of poisoning.  Consult your veterinarian ASAP if this happens.

Dog Drooling and Salivary Gland Problems – WebMD

Time for another poll:

Here’s a video from Mary Livingston of the blog Sneaking Bliss, one of her house guests is very eager for dinner

This is available at Zazzle.com (click on the image for more info)
golden_retriever_i_drool_iphone_5c_covers-r947e81740e3d4e46938400fa1c697ed6_izruf_8byvr_512

Why is My Golden Retrievers’ Nose Turning Brown?

Photo:  TheK9HarperLee.com

Photo: TheK9HarperLee.com

There are actually a few reasons this may be happening. Some say the brown nose is called a “snow nose” and it is caused by the cold weather. My previous golden, Logan, never had a brown nose. We live in Ontario Canada and the winters are fairly cold.  I have seen pictures of goldens in warm climates with brown noses too,  so I realized this isn’t the only reason for a dogs’ nose to change color.

I began an investigation…

An article in WebMD states:

Snow nose is a separate but common condition in which dark pigment on the nose
fades during the winter months and darkens again in spring and summer. Complete
depigmentation does not occur. Snow nose is seen in Siberian Huskies, Golden
Retrievers
, Labrador Retrievers, Bernese Mountain Dogs, and other breeds
.”

Another informative article  “What is Snow Nose” by Janet Tobiassen Crosby DVM suggests that some noses just lighten as the dog ages:

“The cause is not completely understood. Snow nose is more common in
light and white-coated breeds. This condition by itself isn’t a health
problem, but caution is advised in sunny weather, as the depigmented
area is at increased risk for sunburn. Some vets advise testing the
thyroid levels to make sure that there isn’t an underlying thyroid
problem.

Some dogs pigment in the nose just fades over time as they age.”

There is also a possibility it could be caused by using plastic food and water bowls.

Loss of pigment in a dog’s nose can be caused by eating and/or drinking
from plastic or rubber bowls that contain the chemical
p-benzylhydroquinone. This chemical is absorbed through the skin and
stops the formation of melanin. Many vets recommend using stainless
steel
, glass or ceramic bowls instead of plastic to eliminate the

possibility of Plastic Dish Nasal Dermatitis.”  

                                                                          – Dog Health Doc “Color of Dog Noses”

I hope you found this information helpful.  I know we love our goldens no matter what color their noses are.

PLEASE do NOT try and alter the color your dogs nose with shoe polish or magic marker! (yes, I have read about this too!!)

Time for a poll!

References:

Pigmentation Problems of the Nose in Dogs – WebMD

What is Snow Nose – VetMedicine.About.com

Color of Dog Noses – DogHealthDoc.com

“Vet Guru” and Medical Marijuana Veterinarian Dr. Doug Kramer Dead at 36

According to on.AOL.com, Dr. Doug Kramer, aka “The Vet Guru” of Chatsworth, CA passed away on Thursday Aug 22, 2013.  He was only 36 years old.  So far I haven’t been able to find any information on the cause of death.  His obituary doesn’t specify, but does request donations be made to a cancer organization.drdoug

Dr. Kramer was a pioneer in medical marijuana for pets suffering from pain and/or cancer.  He has been featured on pet friendly sites like Dogster and Paw Nation. I’m sure he endured a lot of criticism for his efforts.  Personally speaking, I think it is a terrible loss, and hope that others take up the cause and continue to pioneer the research into this controversial “wonder herb” as it pertains to animals.

I did a blog post on Dr Kramer “Would You Use Medical Marijuana For Your Golden Retriever?” back in April of this year, including a poll.  93% of the voters (at the time of this post) say they would consider using it if their pet were suffering.  While you are here, why don’t you vote..

Dr. Doug’s last tweet was on August 16.

Dr Kramer also promoted holistic pet strips.  Here is a video (with a very unfortunate theme song, I might add…sorry!  You’ve been warned..!)

Thanks for your efforts, Dr. Kramer.

http://on.aol.com/video/pot-for-pet-pain-vet-advocate-dies-at-36-517933063

Reader Question: Spaying an Older Female Golden Retriever

A Golden Retriever at 12 years old with hip pr...

A Golden Retriever at 12 years old with hip problems (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A reader commented on my post On Cancer and Spaying or Neutering Your Golden Retriever and I thought he raised a few good questions.  Was wondering if anyone had any advice for him.  I have only owned male goldens, so I can’t offer any personal advice.

I am currently fostering a 7 yr old golden who supposedly was a breeder dog. In order to go ahead and adopt her. ( She had some health issues we were fostering her for), she also needs to be spayed. My questions are 1. What are the risks at this age ? 2. Does she really need to be spayed from a health standpoint since she will be staying with us forever at this point. Do dogs still go into heat at this age?

Some points are we have other dogs and everyone including the golden get along perfectly by the way.
I guess my main question is is that is it worth the risk to get her spayed for the sake of getting her spayed?
Thanks
Mike

Does anyone have any advice for Mike?

Golden Retriever Service Dog Left in Car for 2 Hours – Dies

Carrboro, NC – I realize that there are many stories in the news of this happening, but apparently it is still not hitting home with some people.

The temperature outside is not relative to the temperature inside a vehicle, and it only takes minutes to reach temps over 100 degrees even when its only 75 outside.

temps

On June 10, Deb Cunningham learned this lesson the hard way.  Deb is a program director at an organization called Eyes, Ears, Nose and Paws.  They are a non-profit organization that trains and places service and diabetic assistance dogs.

On that particular day, Worthy, a 2 year old golden retriever, was suffering separation anxiety so Cunningham took him to the office.  Worthy had completed his training and was scheduled to be placed with his new client the following week.

Because it was only 73 degrees and she parked in the shade (at high noon with the windows up) Cunningham thought the dog would be fine in the car.  Worthy was left in the car to avoid upsetting him as his foster mom was attending the office that afternoon.

2 hours later, when Cunningham returned to the vehicle, Worthy was unconscious and panting.  When she arrived at the vet his temperature was 109.

EENP Executive director Maria Ikenberry says the car was “not hot” when they discovered Worthy and that he was probably anxious and ran circles in the car and overheated.

Sadly, Worthy suffered cardiac arrest and died the next day at Triangle Veterinary Hospital.

The organization is considering disciplinary actions against Cunningham and The Carborro Police are investigating a charge of animal cruelty.

"Worthy" Photo - Herald Sun

“Worthy” Photo – Herald Sun

R.I.P Worthy.  Here’s a video of Worthy from the EENP Website.

Service dog left in car dies from heatstroke – The Herald Sun

How to Protect Your Golden Retriever From Ticks

Due to factors like milder winters, an increase in white tailed deer, and fewer insecticides being used, 2013 was predicted as a record year for ticks.  Ticks are a problem for animals and humans alike.  Tick species vary by location, and different species carry different diseases like Lyme Disease,  Ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Are ticks a problem in your area?  Do you have any ideas or suggestions to keep them away?  I have compiled a list of some of the things you can do to help avoid this very common problem.

 

  • Keep your lawn cut short.  Ticks and other critters love to lurk in long grass
  • Try to avoid long grass and wooded areas
  • Check your dog for ticks every time you bring him/her indoors.
  • Visit your veterinarian every spring to discuss flea/tick and heart worm prevention medications.
  • There are shampoos and collars on the market that deter fleas and ticks.
  • Try a holistic approach such as this homeade recipe from an article in Forbes  It’s Peak Tick Season: 7 Ways to avoid Tick-Borne Disease by Melanie Haiken.

“In a spray bottle, mix 1 cup water and 2 cups distilled white vinegar. (Ticks loathe the smell and taste of vinegar, supposedly.) Add 2 teaspoons vegetable or almond oil, both of which contain sulfur, which ticks also dislike.”

 

 

Tick Population to Explode in 2013 – Veterinary Practice News

Adult deer tick, Ixodes scapularis.

Adult deer tick, Ixodes scapularis. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

  • Joint pain and stiffness similar to the symptoms of arthritis
  • High fever
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Neurological signs resulting in seizures and neck pain (infrequent)

– See more at: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/canine-anaplasmosis#sthash.9KsY5RIW.dpuf

Now that we know this, lets talk prevention.  Here are some things you can do to help protect your golden from these pests:

 

So you have found a tick on your dog.  First, you must remove it with tweezers or a Tick Twister.  It is not recommended that you burn it or suffocate it off with any type of substance, as this can cause the tick to inject more saliva into you or your pet.  Then clean the area with an antiseptic and put some antibiotic ointment on the site.

Here is a great video from Doctors Foster & Smith on removing a tick from your dog:

If your dog has been bitten by a tick, watch for signs of illness including stiffness, loss of appetite and lethargy.  Contact your veterinarian right away if you suspect your dog has a tick borne illness. Keep in mind these illnesses can lay dormant for several months before showing signs.

Would You Use Medical Marijuana For Your Golden Retriever?

Medical Cannabis Growing Operation in Oakland,...

Medical Cannabis Growing Operation in Oakland, California (Photo credit: Rusty Blazenhoff)

So your golden retriever has just been diagnosed with cancer and is very weak and lethargic, and in a lot of pain. If you knew there was an option to ease pain and increase appetite in a safe, chemical free way would you consider it? What if that option was marijuana, what many consider to be the root of all evil?

Marijuana is now legal in over 20 states in the U.S. and has been proven very effective for palliative care in humans, as well as treating many other illnesses.

Dr. Doug Kramer of California is a pioneer in the concept of using medical marijuana to treat dogs and cats and has his own clinic Enlightened Veterinary Therapeutics specializing in palliative and hospice care for pets. The marijuana is administered in the form of a tincture. Dr Kramer is not an advocate of feeding your dog “pot brownies” or blowing smoke in their faces. In an article from Vice he says:

To me, it’s animal abuse, really. It kills me because it devalues what I’m trying to do. Especially in the early stages, starting the dialogue with veterinary medicine, the last thing you want is for people to do that. The dog doesn’t need the medication in that situation.”

Would you use medical marijuana to ease suffering for your golden? I consider it a herbal remedy and certainly would. Please vote! No email or obligation required…